The Vision Thing

You can also just get lazy and let habit shoot for you. When you’re shooting from habit, you just don’t pay atten tion to your visual inputs. A good example is Triple Threat: you push the gun onto the first target and you see the sight drive onto that target and from that point on you may not see the sight again. I was burning out on that stage in practice one day seeing how fast I could shoot it, and I shot three or four runs in a row where I missed the second tar get every time. And that was from being lazy and just sling ing a shot to that target. Shooting a stage like that becomes such a habitual routine that you don’t really see anything; you just kind of point the gun in that direction and fire a shot.

And I experienced just that last month. Take a look look at this video. At first glance, it looks like a pretty smooth run, I even handle the glitch in my round count fairly well.

Except that all throughout that run, I didn’t look at my sights or call my shots, and so I ended up with a HORRIBLE score, including three Mikes and a no-shoot.

It’s been a long time since I shot a stage that poorly. I became complacent, and it came back to bite me in the assets. I learned absolutely NOTHING from that stage, except what not to do, and unfortunately, that’s a lesson I need to keep on learning.

Measure by measure, drop by drop

“I have never, ever met a gun owner who actually believed that more guns would make people safer on the whole. What they do believe, particularly those with military backgrounds, is that their corner of the world is safer if they themselves have a gun.”

- Jeb Golinkin

Well, Jeb, I believe that society would be safer on the whole if more people were responsible gun owners, and a lot of my friends and colleagues believe that as well.

More responsibly armed “civilians” = fewer victims. Fewer victims = less crime. Less crime = safer society.

A rock is not split in two by the actions of a single drop of water: It is split in two when the water becomes irresistible.

Five Year Itch

Gunblogging is not dead. Not while I’m still here.

Five years into things, and what have I’ve learned?

I learned I’m a little bit different than most gunbloggers, and indeed most people in the industry. Despite my unnatural affection for everything made by Česká zbrojovka Uherský Brod, I really have no attachment to the guns themselves, and rarely write about “OMG! Look at this shiny new blaster that just came out!”. Guns are a means to an end for me, and that end is a safe, secure future for my family.

Period, full stop.

If anything, I identify more with the “Gun Culture 2.0” blog than I do with über-tactical crowd. This isn’t too shocking, as marketing is nothing but applied sociology.

Home-focused firearms safety

It might just be the quasi-dead nature of the Naples demographic or the fact that Republicans here tend to be be more mainstream oriented than Tea party sympathizers, but I am seeing a LOT more interest in home defensive firearms and CCW guns than I am in AR-15’s.

Given that there are so many new firearms owners out there that are concerned about home invasion, when was the last time you saw an NRA Personal Protection In The Home or similar class that had people a) bring along their home handgun safe of choice to class and practice opening and drawing from said safe and b) had people draw out a layout of the home and plan a safe room response based on their unique home design?

Maybe a little more time on how to make a safe room and a little less time worrying about HSLD techniques like AIWB would pay off for today’s firearms trainers.

If we want guns to become part of our lifestyle, they need to be part of OUR lifestyle, not the lifestyle of a Delta SEAL Recon operator.

Adjusting your outlook

Now that I’ve had a few months to get used to living in urban Florida, I’ve made a changes to my go-bag and bug-in kit.

First off, I ditched the extra hydration bladder and added a machete. Water is NOT an issue here in swamps as it is in Arizona, but dense vegetation is an issue, however.

Secondly, after talking with co-workers who have lived here since childhood, when a hurricane hits, the electric power will be unavailable for upwards of a month. As our family currently lives in an apartment, our gear and planning need to adjust to that new reality.

Cooking-wise, I don’t have access to my gas grill, so instead I purchased a pair of Sterno stoves and a boatload of extra fuel. A generator is also out of the question, so I went with an inverter instead. The little four-banger in my Honda drinks gas in small sips and we don’t have any major electrical needs beyond our phones, so we should be good for weeks.

Food wise, we have a month’s worth of Wise Food Storage products. We were able to buy one “four week” package each month by skipping one fast food meal a week, and now we’re eating healthier and are set for emergency supplies for a week.

With regards to dealing with the cleanup, I don’t have space for a chainsaw, but I do have space for an axe and a shovel. Prepping isn’t about having all the cool toys, prepping is being able to ride out events with as little disruption as possible.