Nineteenth (-ish) Report

Let’s not talk about the Dot Torture Drill, shall we? I ended up in the mid-30’s, my worst Dot Torture ever, and I trashed the target before I took a picture of it.

The reason? My trigger jerk showed up again. I haven’t been dry-firing as of late, so I have no reason to expect good results from my range time, and guess what, that’s what I got.

Fortunately, I was semi-expecting such things, so I brought along my S&W 22A and picked up 300 Mini-Mags at the range (yes, we have them in-stock) and started to isolate on my trigger.

I *really* like a .22 pistol and a red-dot for such things. The recoil on a .22 is almost non-existent, and the red dot allows me to see how my point of aim is moving around during the trigger press.

100 rounds later, this happened at 15 yards, firing rapidly.

M22a_w_red_dot

I can dig it.

classifier-244x300Another issue I need to work on is the IDPA Classifier, specifically the third stage. The last time I shot it, it was a disaster, with SIXTY-ONE (count ‘em!, 61!) points down on the third stage.

So I decided to practice just the 1st string of fire in the third stage, which goes as follows:

String #1 Shooter Position 4 – Draw and fire 2 shots each at T1 – T3 in Tactical Priority from either side of the barricade using cover, do a Loaded Chamber Reload and fire 2 shots each at T1 – T3 in Tactical Priority from the opposite side of the barricade using cover. (12 shots)

The last time I shot Stage 3, I shot String #1 in 18.7 seconds. Today, I shot it three times, averaging 19.28 seconds, with the target at 12.5 yards, and I’m pretty happy with the results.

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That semi-transperant target is the IDPA target reduced to 50% (because I shot this at 12.5 yards, not 20 yards), and I’m down just 35 points total.

That averages out to 19.28 seconds and 12 points down. Cool.

The day and the hour is unknown

Yikes. Scary stuff happening in Waco yesterday.

Gunfire erupted Sunday among rival biker gangs in Waco, Texas, leaving at least nine people dead, according to police.

Authorities had anticipated trouble and pre-positioned officers.

“There were at least three rival gang groups here this morning for whatever reason. As they were here, we had officers on scene. We expected issues,” said Sgt. W. Patrick Swanton, a police spokesman.

The fight broke out at Twin Peaks restaurant and spilled into the parking lot. It quickly escalated from hands and feet, as weapons, to gunfire, Swanton said.

  1. Kudos the Waco police for being on top of the situation from the get-go.
  2. This didn’t happen at Biker Billy’s Beef N Booze Roadhouse, it happened at a Twin Peaks, a chain restaurant in the grand tradition of Hooters, Tilted Kilt, etc.
  3. If you see a bunch of cops staked out at a restaurant, DON’T GO INTO THE RESTAURANT.
  4. If you don’t see the cops and still go into the restaurant, if there a lot of bikers fingering weapons and growling menacingly, LEAVE THE RESTAURANT. There isn’t a beer in the world worth dying over.
    Well, except for Saisson Dupont, of course…
  5. Sometimes, the bear finds you. The pastor at my old church was at Bike Week in Laughlin the day this happened, and he was literally minutes away from mixed up in this mess. Have a plan to avoid everything altogether, a plan to get out, and a plan if you can’t get out.

It’s just a training issue…

Two unrelated, related items from this week.

  1. Bob Owens’ piece on why Glocks aren’t the guns cops should be using caused a tempest in a pisspot in the online gun community.
    Full Disclosure: Bob called me before he wrote that article and asked me about the benefits of an DA/SA gun versus striker-fired, and I gave hem a recap of what I wrote over here.
    There was the usual outrage from the usual fanboys as to why their particular brand of Austrian engineering is the Best. Gun. Ever., but one comment on Facebook caught my eye (no link, can’t find it) talking about how DA/SA versus striker was a “training issue”.
    Hold that thought.
  2. I had a conversation at work with an unabashed fanboy of Serpa holsters. Any problems with the action of reflexively curling your finger causing negligent discharges as you draw your gun was due, he said, to “training issues”.

I’m sensing a pattern here.

Can the inherit flaws with the Serpa be overcome with training? Yes. Can dealing with a striker-fired gun be overcome with training? Yes. Can getting used to a DA/SA gun be accomplished through training? Yes.

But training time is a finite resource. Should learning how to use your holster without putting a round into your leg be a priority when there are other retention systems out there what work just dandy? Should the hours of practice needed to master the difference between a 8lb first pull and 4lb second pull be a priority over learning sight alignment? Is just learning how to shoot a Glock enough for you, or do you have the need to shoot other guns every once in a while?

That’s the real issue with training.

Quick thoughts on open carry

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Open-carry with a Serpa holster is like wearing a clip-on tie to your best friend’s wedding. You can do better, so do so.

If you want open carry to become the norm, normal people must act normal while carrying openly. People who carry AR-15’s into Jack In The Box are not acting normally.

I miss having open carry. I really do. Even though I carried sans concealment only about once a month at best, there was a pleasant feeling knowing that if I wanted to do it, I could, and would.

I’ve lost weight, and my old open carry belt is too big on me now. Fortunately, I work in a gun store, and replacements are close at hand.

If you can try open carry haven’t, do so soon. You’ll find that all the worries you had about carrying concealed will pop up once again, and just like when you started carrying concealed, no one will care that you have a gun.

A Reminder: “Gun Free Zones”, aren’t

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The metal detectors at Amalie Arena in Tampa are there for your protection. They go off at the slightest whiff of a dangerous weapon, and staffed with security professionals who are trained to stop threats before they happened.

Or, you know, not.

Lucas Cassidy, 27, was removed from Section 320 in the arena and charged with a second-degree misdemeanor for bringing a handgun into the event.

Tampa police say a fan who saw Cassidy drop a handgun in the restroom alerted authorities who arrested him during the third period of the game.

“We would rather that it hadn’t happened, we wish it didn’t,” said Amalie Arena Vice President Mary Milne.

Asked how Cassidy got past security, Milne said it was human error.

Cassidy, she says, had set off a metal detector, but showed a staff member the keys in his pocket. With a crowd of people still waiting to get into the game, he was let through without being rechecked.

Legal notice: Don’t carry your otherwise-legal firearm in place you shouldn’t, especially in government buildings, schools and the like. That’s bad, bad juju.

That being said, have I waltzed past “No guns allowed” signs posted in private businesses while carrying? Yep.

Concealed means concealed, after all.

What this incident really shows is the utter futility of “gun free zones”. Despite a metal detector and security guard, there was a gun in the arena. Probably more than one.

Build a better mousetrap, and smarter mice will figure out ways to get the cheese.

Exit question: This incident started when a gun was dropped onto the floor and panic ensued. Would the response to this stupid accident have been different in Florida had an open carry law?

The police are the “only ones” qualified to carry a gun…

Number of guns I’ve left in a public restroom this year: Zero.
Number of guns the D.C. Capitol Police have left in a public restroom this year: Three (so far).

When a member of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s security detail left his Glock and magazine stuffed in the toilet seat cover holder of a Capitol Visitor Center bathroom stall, a CVC worker found the gun, according to a source familiar with the Jan. 29 incident and two other disturbing instances when Capitol Police left loaded firearms in problematic places.

A 7- or 8-year-old child visiting the Capitol with his parents found the next loaded Glock lost by a dignitary protection officer, according to the source. A member of the security detail for John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, allegedly left the firearm in the bathroom of the Speaker’s Suite on March 24.

A third Glock was found the night of April 16 by a janitor cleaning the Capitol Police headquarters building on D Street NE. The weapon was left in plain sight, sparking additional concern about the department charged with protecting one of the world’s most important and frequently visited complexes.

This country is in the very best of hands.

Roadmap

“Run a stage once, and then look at the components of the stage that are giving us trouble. The sport requires the same stuff over and over and over again. All you have to do is identify what those elements are, and then practice them in isolation.”

Steve Anderson

In general, I don’t like comparing myself to other people, because it’s a no-win situation. Someone else will ALWAYS be better than you at something: There is no such thing as a master of everything.

But.

I think I’m pretty good at analyzing where my issues with practical shooting lie, what I lack is having a higher standard to measure myself against. I need to start recording the runs of the A Class shooters (and better) in my squads to see where they are picking up the seconds on a stage compared to my performance. In order to be better, I need to learn from my betters.

On Red Dots On Glocks

Based on my limited experience with the suckers, I’ve found that if it’s properly co-witnessed with the iron sights, a red dot is essentially just a really big, easily viewable fiber optic front sight. The body index skills you already have and the sight alignment skills you already know will work in 95% of the situations you’ll face. Red dots shine (pun intended) when there’s a 30 yard shot or longer to be made, then they really, really help. They’re not a magic wand that allows you to make a shot anywhere, anytime, but they definitely make your pistol perform just a little bit better at a time when you may need it the most.