The Vision Thing

You can also just get lazy and let habit shoot for you. When you’re shooting from habit, you just don’t pay atten tion to your visual inputs. A good example is Triple Threat: you push the gun onto the first target and you see the sight drive onto that target and from that point on you may not see the sight again. I was burning out on that stage in practice one day seeing how fast I could shoot it, and I shot three or four runs in a row where I missed the second tar get every time. And that was from being lazy and just sling ing a shot to that target. Shooting a stage like that becomes such a habitual routine that you don’t really see anything; you just kind of point the gun in that direction and fire a shot.

And I experienced just that last month. Take a look look at this video. At first glance, it looks like a pretty smooth run, I even handle the glitch in my round count fairly well.

Except that all throughout that run, I didn’t look at my sights or call my shots, and so I ended up with a HORRIBLE score, including three Mikes and a no-shoot.

It’s been a long time since I shot a stage that poorly. I became complacent, and it came back to bite me in the assets. I learned absolutely NOTHING from that stage, except what not to do, and unfortunately, that’s a lesson I need to keep on learning.

Five Year Itch

Gunblogging is not dead. Not while I’m still here.

Five years into things, and what have I’ve learned?

I learned I’m a little bit different than most gunbloggers, and indeed most people in the industry. Despite my unnatural affection for everything made by Česká zbrojovka Uherský Brod, I really have no attachment to the guns themselves, and rarely write about “OMG! Look at this shiny new blaster that just came out!”. Guns are a means to an end for me, and that end is a safe, secure future for my family.

Period, full stop.

If anything, I identify more with the “Gun Culture 2.0” blog than I do with über-tactical crowd. This isn’t too shocking, as marketing is nothing but applied sociology.

Securing the sanctuary.

“You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.” 

– Matthew 5:43-45, NIV

If nothing else, the horror in Charleston last week should prompt churches into realizing that loving your enemies and relying on God to protect you is a great idea, but relying on God and 124 grain hollowpoints is a better idea. I don’t hate my enemies, but I won’t let them destroy me, either.

If you’re a church leader, and your church does not have a disaster plan, MAKE ONE, for God’s (literal) sake. That plan should cover fire, armed intruders and whatever natural disasters are common to your region: A church in Saskatchewan probably shouldn’t worry about a hurricane, but a blizzard that traps in a congregation overnight is a very real possibility in such climes.

Have a plan. Have a backup plan, and have the means to put those plans into action.

Stuff happens, and the Gospel of Matthew tells us it happens on the righteous and unrighteous in equal amounts. Pray about it, and then deal with it.

Trust the System, Game the System

Although I have it on good gunblogging authority that I should not use Reddit as a source for articles, this is a great question and answer session about the current state of the art in machine gun trusts.

Bottom line: The ATF said at one point that a gun trust is not a person, and issued a tax stamp for a post-1986 fully automatic firearm. They then dis-approved their approval (how one does that remains to be seen…) and yanked the stamp. Fun (and lawsuits) ensued.

Read the whole thing.

Five… Four… Three…

I finally figured out my Cerakote 3 Gun Color Scheme.

I’m going with something that’s a treasured memory from growing up in Canada, something that reflects my years living in Arizona, and something that echoes my lifelong interest in aviation.

Ladies and Gentlemen, THUNDERBIRDS ARE GO!!!!!!

The pistol: Thunderbird One

thunderbird-1-mb-2-2

The shotgun: Thunderbird Two

Thunderbird-2-M3-4

The rifle: Thunderbird Three

thunderbird-3-mb-4

The Thunderbirds was my favorite TV show as a kid, and the Thunderbird is a reoccurring theme in the Phoenix area where I lived for so long, and of course, let’s not forget the USAF Thunderbirds.

Now to get the darn things into production…