Pistols are Catholic. AR-15’s are Protestant.*

At my shop, we have a wall pretty much 100% dedicated to AR-15’s …

The Cool Wall

… and a yards-long display case dedicated to 1911’s.

IMG_4422

One is the most popular model of rifle in America today, and the other is a very popular design of pistol that has served this country for decades.

The thing is, though, I can pretty much mix and match components out of all the guns on the AR wall. Spike’s lower with a CMMG upper with a Troy hand guard? No problem!

Try doing something similar with a 1911, without the services of a gunsmith and CNC milling machine. And God help you if you want to mix and mingle parts from polymer guns from different manufacturers.

How come if I want to buy a pistol I must make a commitment to a single cause, to a single manufacturer, but if I want to buy an AR, the sky is the limit? Why must I worship at the One True Church of CZ for a pistol, when my AR gets to pick and chose from a rich banquet of theology and/or gun parts?

Sig is showing us that no, your gun does NOT have to be a closed system. Want to change calibers or frame sizes? Go right ahead. Maybe someday, we’ll be having S&W slides on a Ruger frame. Until then, the heretics will get burned, and Glock devotees can worship at the feet of Gaston in peace, knowing that their faith is unquestioned.

For now.

* Quite the catchy headline, no? Blame Umberto Eco for it.

The police are the “only ones” qualified to carry a gun…

Number of guns I’ve left in a public restroom this year: Zero.
Number of guns the D.C. Capitol Police have left in a public restroom this year: Three (so far).

When a member of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s security detail left his Glock and magazine stuffed in the toilet seat cover holder of a Capitol Visitor Center bathroom stall, a CVC worker found the gun, according to a source familiar with the Jan. 29 incident and two other disturbing instances when Capitol Police left loaded firearms in problematic places.

A 7- or 8-year-old child visiting the Capitol with his parents found the next loaded Glock lost by a dignitary protection officer, according to the source. A member of the security detail for John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, allegedly left the firearm in the bathroom of the Speaker’s Suite on March 24.

A third Glock was found the night of April 16 by a janitor cleaning the Capitol Police headquarters building on D Street NE. The weapon was left in plain sight, sparking additional concern about the department charged with protecting one of the world’s most important and frequently visited complexes.

This country is in the very best of hands.

Here is your future, unarmed America

Let’s count it down, shall we?

Failed attempts at gun control? Check.
Increasing crime rates? Check.
Violent, ruthless street gangs? Check.
Politicization and corruption of law enforcement? Check.

I have seen your future, California, and it looks a lot like Caracas.

Interview With A Professional Kidnapper

Gonzalez began by explaining “the market.” He targeted Venezuela’s middle classes, rather than the rich. Going after the rich invited additional police scrutiny or, worse heavily armed private guards driving armoured vehicles. For the same reasons and because they seldom had Venezuelan bank accounts that could be quickly emptied, it did not make economic sense to kidnap foreigners.

Before deciding whether to kidnap someone, gang members followed their movements closely for about a month to understand how and where they lived, worked and played. This was not only to figure out the best time and place to grab them, but also to find out whether their kin were likely to be able to cough up a ransom of 100,000 to 200,000 bolivars (about US$300 to US$600 on the black market, US$16,000 to $32,000 at the official exchange rate).

And before you think, “Well, that’s just Venezuela. What are the chances this could happen close to the U.S.?”…

… have you seen what is (still) going on in Mexico City?

In Mexico, with its history of drug-war violence and corrupt police, kidnapping is an old story. In the past, the crime tended to target the rich. Now it has become more egalitarian. Victims these days are often shopkeepers, taxi drivers, service employees, parking attendants and taco vendors who often work in cash or in Mexico’s “informal” economy. Targets also tend to be young — students, with parents willing to pay ransoms, are commonly targeted.

How long before MS13, La eMe, etc, figure out there’s as much money to be made from kidnapping middle class citizenry as there is from smuggling in people and/or drugs into the U.S.?

The only two things that are holding back this nightmare scenario from happening that I can see are the (mostly) honest police forces in the U.S. and the presence of a well-armed middle class.

When those two things go away, what hope is there for the citizenry?

Being your own first responder by arming yourself is a very good thing indeed, but it’s even better if it is also backed up by the fair and firm rule of law. When the rule of law becomes politicized, the criminals will realize that politics is the way to power.

Update: A little cheerful reading for you on a Tuesday morning – When the Music Stops. I’d like to believe that such a scenario is unlikely (even improbable), but given the reality of today’s political situation, I can’t.

The Guns And problem

Is gunblogging dead?

No.

Is gunblogging changing?

Yes.

At SHOT this year, I hung out in The Bourbon Room with Jay, Tom, Paul and Bob on Monday night. Tales were told, sour mash was consumed, camaraderie ensued.

And all of us started out in the gunblogging/new media world, and now we’re shakers/movers of some kind or another in the larger firearms world.

And we’re not alone. Just like the media world as a whole, gunbloggers are moving away from just new media and into other endeavors. Just that mean gunblogging is dead? No. Does that mean that blogging now needs to compete with all the other new media channels out there? Yes.

There’s also the “guns and” problem. I’ve managed to keep politics and other stuff out of this blog, at the expense of the main political blog (although to be fair, that blog started to wither away since my co-blogger became rich and famous), but the majority of other “gunblogs” out there are guns and politics and food and music and etsy crochet projects.

Ok, not that last one. Yet.

I’m actually ok with this, because it puts guns in context of your life. It’s no big deal, it’s just your gun. Gunblogging reflects this trend, then, that guns are (and should be) a means, not the end.

Today’s Writing Assignment, Class…

… is to re-write the following paragraph to describe an experience that is fun, exciting and reflects a positive outlook on the world around you. To make things easier for you, I’ve bolded all the positive words and italicized all the negative one.


 

AGAINST ALL ODDS: A class that takes defensive handgun skills beyond the basics and into the practical. During this action-packed weekend, you’ll learn to defend yourself even if you’re knocked off your feet and even if someone tries to take your gun away from you. You’ll also learn secrets of drawing the gun in difficult circumstances, such as when you’re curled up in a tight space or lying flat on your back.


 

Based on that pitch, what is the product that the consumer is buying? Is it competence, independence, self reliance, or an hours-long wrestling match culminating in a nasty and scary trip inside a criminal’s mind?

Now first off, let me apologize profusely to Kathy Jackson, the trainer whose class that is, because she “gets it” and is a first-rate, top-notch A-Number-One trainer who I’d take a class with anytime, anywhere. And also, I know *I* write pretty similar things, because that’s how I also see the world.

But.

That’s pretty typical of how firearms training classes are described, because the people who are doing the description write the classes for themselves and people like them. I’m guilty as hell as well (I *swear* I am not picking on you, Kathy! ;) ), because we all write from our experience, and our experience (and situational awareness) tells us the world is a nasty place, because, well, it is. So what then? Is the customer is supposed to throw money at the trainer to get the negativity to stop? Not that great of a marketing pitch, IMO.

Most people don’t think like firearms trainers think, or else concealed carry rates would be at 90%, not less than 10%. So when firearms trainers try to market any advanced practical training, right off the bat, we’re marketing to a small percentage of a small percentage of the population. We (and I count myself is as well, as I’m marketing the training classes for the range as I type this) are a niche market of a niche market.

So the question is, do you market to the niche of a niche, or to the other 90%? If it’s to the niche, expect results that match your audience size. If it’s to the other 90%, why use niche language and a niche mindset?

Something to think about.

Still got the shutter bug.

Even though it’s been at least a dozen years since I tripped the the shutter for a living (and five years since my last big gig), I can still pull out a good shot or two when needed.

Did a day’s worth of shooting for the day job over the weekend, and I’m pretty happy with the results.

Naples Gun Range VIP shooting range in Florida The Alamo by Lotus Gunworks Womens shooting instruction in Naples

Gear for the shoot, if you must know, was this cheap-o Chinese lighting kit, a flex reflector and my old D70.

Oh, and gaffer’s tape, foam core and a-clamps, because let’s face it, when you get right down to it, those are more important than the camera.

No, really.

Things might have gone a bit smoother on the shoot if I had access to my old reliable Speedotrons, but hey, time (and gear) marches on. Besides, I picked up the entire new system for the price of one flash head from my old lighting kit. Granted, I now have four 200w/s monoblocks instead of 9600w/s worth of lights that can (and have) lit up a basketball arena, but what I have works for me, and that’s the way I like it.

More than just a shot.

Tam resolves to take better pictures this year, and that got me thinking about my journey as a shooter, both with a camera and gun.

I had a photo-j teacher who had the most brutal method of critiquing student’s work I’ve ever experienced. He just asked “What did you want to accomplish with this picture, and did you succeed at doing it?”

That simple question would not only crush my soul, but at the end of each critique, it would leave me utterly convinced that should I give up my goal of being a photographer and give up seeing for all eternity by stabbing out my eyes like Oedipus Rex.

But I got better at it, and eventually made a living in the photo business for 10 years (more on that later). Having to defend my photos as more than just another pretty snapshot made me think about what I was putting into each shot. Why was I taking that shot? Why was I at a given location, and what did I hope to accomplish with my photos? Thinking about the shots I wanted to get before I even loaded the camera was a trick I could use when taking still lifes, portraits or even shooting the hectic pace of a pro basketball game.

It’s also something that I now do unconsciously. Even if I’m using my iPhone, I’m looking at lighting, background and composition to make them more than just grab shots. It doesn’t detract from the photo experience, but rather, pays off in photos that I believe capture the moment and will be a keepsake forever.

Now on to guns. As I said awhile back, I don’t just go shoot to have fun anymore, I go to work on something, be it draw time or getting rifle DOPE or a Dot Torture, and I accept that fact. I take guns seriously now, and that means changing how I use them. There will come a time, though, when time/money/effort will stack the deck against me, and I won’t be able to put in the effort to improve my shooting techniques. I’ll have to just roll with that I have at that moment, and while that is scary, it is is reality.

And the reality is, I wasn’t able to put in the time and effort needed to take my photography to a level needed to make a living at it. I was a *heck* of a photo assistant (the best in town, if I do say so myself), but I chose (and it was a choice) not to put in the effort needed to make the jump to tripping the shutter for a living. I could see where photography was going post-film, and I wasn’t ready to put in the effort to make it work.

Which is ok, because my post-photography life is pretty awesome right now. Yes, comparing snapping pics to shooting a firearm is ridiculous in many ways (even Bob Capa never had to defend his life with a camera), but in any process of self-improvement, you’re going to get to a place where you reach the end of yourself and accept your limitations. Mine was that I was a good photo assistant, not a good photographer. I’ve yet to find the outer limits of my abilities as a shooter.

Should be interesting when I do.