I won a gun

First it was the new CZ, now this. I won A Daniel Defense DDM4V1, courtesy of Friends Of The NRA.

ddmv1-2

The DDM4v1, the original Daniel Defense Rifle, is built with a Cold Hammer Forged 16” M4 Profile barrel with a Carbine gas system.  It comes installed with our proprietary front sight base which is precision CNC machined from a solid billet of 4140 steel.  This FSB features a serrated curved design to minimize glare and is salt bath nitride treated minimizing corrosion and wear.  The DDM4 Rail 12.0™ FSP allows the operator to mount a weapon light or aiming device forward of the front sight for optimal ergonomics and a clear line of sight.  Quick disconnect attachment points are integrated to the front and back on both sides of the rail for fully ambidextrous sling attachment.  This rifle also comes with the newly designed, rugged and comfortable Daniel Defense Buttstock and Pistol Grip.

Yay me!

It’s a good gun, but I think I’ll sell it and use my ill-botten gooty to pick up a 1911 for Single Stack and tweak the new CZ for use as a backup for Production.

New Acquisition: Another CZ!

Gosh, what are the odds?

AIM Surplus had these for sale last night, and I got one for myself (with the wife’s permission, of course) as a combination birthday/Father’s Day gift. Good thing I did, because they sold out an hour later after I bought one.

Used CZ75 for sale

Czech manufacture CZ 75 9mm caliber semi-automatic Handgun. Law Enforcement Trade-Ins from Israel… Incredible single/double action “cock and lock” pistols that feature all steel construction and a hammer forged barrel. These short recoil operated, locked breech handguns are in excellent mechanical condition, just some metal finish wear as the pictures show. Include one 15rd magazine.

So now (with a little work) I’ll have a backup to the Production CZ75 I’ve been using, and CZ-USA has Pre-B mags in-stock.

Cool.

It’s just a training issue…

Two unrelated, related items from this week.

  1. Bob Owens’ piece on why Glocks aren’t the guns cops should be using caused a tempest in a pisspot in the online gun community.
    Full Disclosure: Bob called me before he wrote that article and asked me about the benefits of an DA/SA gun versus striker-fired, and I gave hem a recap of what I wrote over here.
    There was the usual outrage from the usual fanboys as to why their particular brand of Austrian engineering is the Best. Gun. Ever., but one comment on Facebook caught my eye (no link, can’t find it) talking about how DA/SA versus striker was a “training issue”.
    Hold that thought.
  2. I had a conversation at work with an unabashed fanboy of Serpa holsters. Any problems with the action of reflexively curling your finger causing negligent discharges as you draw your gun was due, he said, to “training issues”.

I’m sensing a pattern here.

Can the inherit flaws with the Serpa be overcome with training? Yes. Can dealing with a striker-fired gun be overcome with training? Yes. Can getting used to a DA/SA gun be accomplished through training? Yes.

But training time is a finite resource. Should learning how to use your holster without putting a round into your leg be a priority when there are other retention systems out there what work just dandy? Should the hours of practice needed to master the difference between a 8lb first pull and 4lb second pull be a priority over learning sight alignment? Is just learning how to shoot a Glock enough for you, or do you have the need to shoot other guns every once in a while?

That’s the real issue with training.

Tab Clearing, 05/12/15 Edition

A few notes in passing…

Congratulations to my TeamGunblogger cohort Jaci Janes for joining Team Sig Sauer! Jaci’s innate talent and commitment to the shooting sports far exceeds mine, so it’s good to see all her hard work rewarded in this way.

Ben and Luke over at Triangle Tactical tackle my question about practical shooting drills for an indoor range, and I like their ideas. I should note that the Surefire Shot Timer app comes with a dandy par timer setting which would work well with their suggestions.

Should you ever shoot someone in the back? Good question. About 15 years ago, I did a run through the Tempe Police Department video simulator, and did quite well on the shoot/no shoot tests, right up to the point where I refused to back-shoot someone who had just shot my partner. The prep made it to cover, and shot me. Game over. Looking back on it now, the programmers of the sim decided the dude was an “imminent deadly threat” because he already offed a (virtual) cop and therefore was likely to kill again. Which he did. I get the idea, but still, shooting someone in the back seems…

Four Months Without A Gun

florida_concealed_carry_permit

Due to a snafu with my mailing address, I *finally* received my Florida CCW today, after applying for it back in January of this year. The last time I legally carried a firearm for self-defense was December 19, 2014, and going so long without a CCW gun has taught me a few lessons…

  1. Naples is a very safe city. Not safe enough that I’m comfortable without a gun near me, though.
  2. A gun in my car is NOT near enough.
  3. A flashlight and awareness are very nice tools for self-protection. A flashlight, awareness and a CZ P07 is MUCH better.
  4. You get used to not carrying a gun. That’s not a good thing. Now I need to re-learn daily carry, and as I do so, I’ll update things, as I think it will give me a fresh perspective on the armed lifestyle.

Oh, and things are calming down at work after our opening (I have a day off this week! Yay!) so expect more content as well.

Roadmap

“Run a stage once, and then look at the components of the stage that are giving us trouble. The sport requires the same stuff over and over and over again. All you have to do is identify what those elements are, and then practice them in isolation.”

Steve Anderson

In general, I don’t like comparing myself to other people, because it’s a no-win situation. Someone else will ALWAYS be better than you at something: There is no such thing as a master of everything.

But.

I think I’m pretty good at analyzing where my issues with practical shooting lie, what I lack is having a higher standard to measure myself against. I need to start recording the runs of the A Class shooters (and better) in my squads to see where they are picking up the seconds on a stage compared to my performance. In order to be better, I need to learn from my betters.

15:01

Little bit of advice: If the target demographic for your product tends to own lots and lots of guns, headlining a pro-gun control rally might NOT be considered a wise career move.

But why let that stop you?

On July 17, country singers Tim McGraw and Billy Currington will headline a fundraiser for gun control group Sandy Hook Promise in Connecticut. McGraw’s “A Concert For Sandy Hook Promise” will also feature country singers Billy Currington and Chase Bryant.

What, were the Dixie Chicks not available?

A mile wide, an inch deep

Something I’ve found out after almost a year on the other side of the gun counter: If you want to work in the industry, having some knowledge about a bunch of firearms related things trumps knowing every little thing there is to know about, say, the AR-15. You never know who is going to walk in the door / send you an email / call on the phone, so being able to talk intelligently about sporting clays with one guy and then switch over and chat about concealed carry for women five minutes later is a very, very useful skill.

And not just “Yeah, my Dad had a gun like that, but I never shot it” type conversations, either. If I have one piece of advice for anyone who wants to get into the industry, it’s shoot a bunch of guns in a bunch of different settings. Don’t just go to one range and do one type of shooting all the time: If you plink, try shooting clays. If you shoot scatter guns, try precision rifle. Take a good pistol course. Shoot 3 gun, bullseye and go hunting. Learn a little bit about a bunch of things, because that helps you understand HOW your customers use their guns, and that helps you sell them the guns they want and or/need to enjoy those activities a little bit more.