SHOT Shot 2015 Is A Wrap.

And I’m utterly and completely spent. The difference between going to SHOT to write about SHOT and going to SHOT to do business is the difference between watching a marathon and being in a marathon.

Some highlights.

Sig Sauer Range Day was definitely a highlight, and shooting SBR versions of the MPX and 716 7.62mm were definitely highlights. Also, the more I shoot the P320, the more I like it, and I liked it a LOT when it was rolled out last year.

While we’re on SIG, they are definitely on a roll right now. While Glock introduced red-dot slides, Springfield introduced the XDM-2 and Smith and Wesson introduced, um, errr, well, not really anything, SIG has moved on to optics, with top-notch glass created by team members originally from Leupold and silencers created by the mad geniuses who built everything of interest at AAC.

Because silencers are cool.

Bits and pieces of other cool things:

A Ceratoked 1911. I don’t know whether to load ammo into this, or preflight it for takeoff.

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The Fostech Origin 12. Maybe the ultimate in Saiga-style shotguns. Want one SO badly.

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Speaking of nice things, Korth firearms impressed everyone with their Sky Marshall revolver (and it is VERY impressive), but their 1911’s are INSANE. From the frame down, they’re a 1911, but the slide and barrel use an HK roller-locking system to create a gun like none other.

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And now on to something not quite as nice. The Taurus Curve is not all that bad: There is a “peep sight” in the crosshairs that does allow you something like a sight picture, and the trigger is the best of any striker/DAO .380 I’ve tried. I wouldn’t carry one without a holster, but it stacks up well against the LCP, P3AT and other such guns.

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And to fly RAPIDLY down to bottom of the barrel, oh Sarsilmaz, you so funny. Last year, it was designing a gun for six-fingered women, and this year, well, see for yourself.

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Marketing guns to women: You’re doing it wrong.

A Gunblogger’s Best Friend.

Larry Weeks

Larry Weeks has been a tireless champion of the Gunblogging world, and he finally had the good sense to retire from the hectic world of retail firearms sales and take up the serene, contemplative sport of auto racing.

No, really.

Those of us who do this ’cause we like it owe him a big debt of gratitude. He was one of the first people in the big boys to take us seriously, and he leaves behind some mighty big shoes to fill.

Good luck, Larry, and may all the flags you see be checkered black and white.

 

The Army Rejects the Beretta M9A3 Pistol

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Supposedly, the M9A3 is now telling everyone that actually, THEY rejected the Army first, and they’re now seeing someone new who’s TOTALLY AWESOME and not like that total lame-o loser military contract they were seeing last year.

Reports that the M9A3 is, in reality, curled up on the sofa, wearing a camo Snuggie and listening to James Blunt songs while scarfing down their third pint of Ben’N’Jerry’s remain unconfirmed at this time.

It’s Tam’s internet, we just play in it.

As seen on the Book Of Face:

A thread I have never ever seen on a firearms forum:

“Hi, everybody! Well, with the news stories that have been on lately, my boyfriend has decided that he wants to start CCWing. He’s been resistant to the idea before, so I didn’t try to force him, but now that he wants to carry, I realize I have no idea what would be a good gun for a man. You married ladies, what kind of gun is popular with the fellas in your life?”

Because that would sound %$@#ing retarded.

That’s all for me, folks, I can’t top that today.

New New Year’s Shootey Goals

Didn’t really do to good with goals I set last year (what else is new?), and I partly blame the tremendous upheaval our family went through in 2014, but those same upheavals gave me the tools with which to make those goals this year.

Lemme ‘splain.

I had the goal last year of making B Class Production and IDPA Sharpshooter. My plan to achieve that was to shoot more matches, something that moving across the country (twice!) interrupted.

In the words of Tony Stark, “Not a great plan.” Shooting a match did not give me more insight into how I needed to improve my shooting: I had reached a plateau, and I didn’t know it. All that shooting was making me one HECK of a C Class shooter, but nothing more than that.

Having a shooting hiatus imposed on me due to the changes in my life gave me time to pause and reflect on where I was as a shooter and made me realize that what I needed was more matches, but more off-line practice.

So that’s my resolution for 2015: A combination of shooting analysis, dry-fire practice, drills and matches designed to boost my skill with a handgun to where I can shoot Sharpshooter in IPDA and B Class in Production. My goals are not the finish line of the new classifications, my goal is the process.

My other goals (and again, they are process-orented) is get sufficient DOPE on my rifle out to at least 500 yards and to switch my 3 Gun shotshell system from the California Competition Works holders I currently use to a Taccom Duaload system, because gamer.

Gun-wise, I’d love to get a pistol-caliber AR carbine or similar, however, the CZ Scorpion and CMR-30 are calling out to me with a clear, strong siren’s call, and a 1911 set up for Single-Stack is still on my wishlist.

Happy New Year, everyone, and may all your Mikes be on no-penalty disappearing targets.

No New Media Party At SHOT This Year

The last three years I went to SHOT as pretty much an observer, commenting on what’s going on without having to worry about the business side of things. It turns out, though, that actually BEING in the industry means you have things you need to be accountable for, like launching a marketing plan and a website and revenue and all that icky stuff.

So instead of the Venetian, I’ll be dealing with WordPress plugins.

Bummer. If you’re going, hoist one for me.

More than just a shot.

Tam resolves to take better pictures this year, and that got me thinking about my journey as a shooter, both with a camera and gun.

I had a photo-j teacher who had the most brutal method of critiquing student’s work I’ve ever experienced. He just asked “What did you want to accomplish with this picture, and did you succeed at doing it?”

That simple question would not only crush my soul, but at the end of each critique, it would leave me utterly convinced that should I give up my goal of being a photographer and give up seeing for all eternity by stabbing out my eyes like Oedipus Rex.

But I got better at it, and eventually made a living in the photo business for 10 years (more on that later). Having to defend my photos as more than just another pretty snapshot made me think about what I was putting into each shot. Why was I taking that shot? Why was I at a given location, and what did I hope to accomplish with my photos? Thinking about the shots I wanted to get before I even loaded the camera was a trick I could use when taking still lifes, portraits or even shooting the hectic pace of a pro basketball game.

It’s also something that I now do unconsciously. Even if I’m using my iPhone, I’m looking at lighting, background and composition to make them more than just grab shots. It doesn’t detract from the photo experience, but rather, pays off in photos that I believe capture the moment and will be a keepsake forever.

Now on to guns. As I said awhile back, I don’t just go shoot to have fun anymore, I go to work on something, be it draw time or getting rifle DOPE or a Dot Torture, and I accept that fact. I take guns seriously now, and that means changing how I use them. There will come a time, though, when time/money/effort will stack the deck against me, and I won’t be able to put in the effort to improve my shooting techniques. I’ll have to just roll with that I have at that moment, and while that is scary, it is is reality.

And the reality is, I wasn’t able to put in the time and effort needed to take my photography to a level needed to make a living at it. I was a *heck* of a photo assistant (the best in town, if I do say so myself), but I chose (and it was a choice) not to put in the effort needed to make the jump to tripping the shutter for a living. I could see where photography was going post-film, and I wasn’t ready to put in the effort to make it work.

Which is ok, because my post-photography life is pretty awesome right now. Yes, comparing snapping pics to shooting a firearm is ridiculous in many ways (even Bob Capa never had to defend his life with a camera), but in any process of self-improvement, you’re going to get to a place where you reach the end of yourself and accept your limitations. Mine was that I was a good photo assistant, not a good photographer. I’ve yet to find the outer limits of my abilities as a shooter.

Should be interesting when I do.