The Unreality May Overwhelm You.

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… so I post what I thought was a fairly innocuous question in a popular gun rights group on Facebook.

I’ve seen a lot of people showing off their carry guns and guns they carry in their vehicles, but what I haven’t seen a lot of is people talking about how they carry a first aid kit that’s capable of dealing with a gunshot wound or other trauma.
If we carry a gun because we know that the cops won’t show up when we need them, shouldn’t we also have a first aid/trauma kit because the paramedics won’t show up any faster than the cops do?

Reactions to this post fell into one of two categories:

  1. Why should I care about performing first aid on the bad guy?
  2. Sure! I got a nice big kit in my truck!

So people tend to see GSW’s and other traumatic injuries as something that will only happen to the bad guy, because, um, they just will! Apparently these people have never considered that a gunfight might be a two-way affair.

They also think that having a first-aid kit in their vehicle is being prepared to deal with a gunshot wound. Would they also consider themselves as being prepared to deal with a gunfight if their gun was in their truck when they needed it most?

Faith-Based Firearms Training

If I myself set the standards for what it would get me into heaven, you’re darn right I’m going to set standards that I am capable of passing. I’d say something like “Don’t use Microsoft Windows, drink light beer or go to an American League game (because the DH sucks) and lo, yours is the kingdom of Heaven.”

By the same token, if I set the standards for when I feel I’m good enough to defend myself with a firearm, chances are, I’m going to set the standards at a point I know I’m capable of reaching. I can hit paper at 25 yards? Dude, I am SO ready!

The problem is, most firearms owners today feel they are capable of defending themselves with their gun, but they have no desire to expose themselves to a revival service (also called a basic pistol class or a match) and have a “come to Jesus” moment on how bad they really are and how woefully unprepared they are to put rounds on-target under stress. The only thing that saves most of them, I think, is that the crooks are even less-prepared to deal with a gunfight, and tend to run away when things go bad for them.

This is not true of an active shooter. Dealing with an active shooter, someone who will not give up until you and a bunch of other people are dead, is taking things to a new level. Flight 93 showed us that even the most determined of attackers can be stopped, but only at a high, high cost to ourselves.

Not sure if I’m ready. And I know I don’t want to find out if I am.

Your Ideas Intrigue Me and I Wish To Subscribe To Your Newsletter.

A striker-fired LCP? Yes, please!

So, a little bird told me recently that we may see a new striker-fired Ruger LCP in the coming weeks.
Presumably, the company will follow the naming convention it used with the LC9 pistol by adding an “s” at the end of the LCP to indicate the new firing mechanism.
If the rumor is true, and we are going to see a new Ruger LCPs, I wonder if that spells the end of the hammer-fired versions of the tiny handguns.

If there’s one thing that all pocket .380’s have in common, it’s that their triggers really, really suck. The only exception to the rule are the ones based on the 1911 platform like the Sig P238 or Colt Mustang, and they have the added baggage of external safeties (not one of my favorite things on a defensive handgun). A pocket .380 with a decent (say, 6 pounds) trigger a la the Glock 42 would be a winner, and because of the ongoing struggles with my P3AT, I’d look VERY hard at getting one when it comes out.

Mind of No Mind

I’m in agreement with Gabe here, though I’ll take it one stop further than he does.

I use some that favor low stances and quick foot work, others that favor circular arm movements, and others that are quick and staccato in movement.

But I do them routinely, like I work dry-firing – the pistol kata – into my daily life.  From mindfulness comes mindlessness…and from a study of patterns comes freedom from patterns.

Thanks to competition, I don’t think about reloading under pressure, I just do it. Yes, I may not do them all the time with my head up in a state of tactical awareness all the time, but the mag goes into the gun quickly and smoothly and my sights are back on target right quickly. You learn in a match how to move quickly and safely with a gun in your hand. You learn what you need to see to get your hits on-target quickly and efficiently. You learn to deal with small amounts of stress so you’ll be able to deal with the stress of a gun fight.

Dry fire is kata. Matches are sparring. Gun fights are, well, gun fights.

What If The Next Rung On The Ladder Isn’t There?

I’ve been on a tear recently about how few people who get a concealed carry permit and then do anything with it, like, oh, I don’t know… CARRY A GUN.

I honestly can’t understand that. It’s like getting a driver’s license and then immediately selling your car and riding the bus for the rest of your life.

It occurred to me this morning, though, that maybe people don’t get post-CCW training is because the post-CCW training offered by their permit instructor SUCKS. Most instructors, I believe, look at the minimum requirements needed to teach concealed carry, get them, and then stop because hey, I’m qualified now. They don’t teach advanced classes because they can’t teach advanced classes. At best, they’ll get an additional NRA cert, like Personal Protection Outside The House, and away they go.

No additional trust images, no evidence of outside learning, no evidence of ongoing education, just hey, NRA Qualified Instructor!

We don’t allow our kids to be taught by a teacher who stopped learning the day they graduated with their degree, so why should we settle for a CCW instructor whose last training class was during the Bush Administration?

The Bush Sr. administration.

This attitude of instructor complacency needs to change. If instructors want better students and more revenue opportunities, they need to be better instructors.

What Caliber You Use Doesn’t Matter…. Until It Does.

An interesting reflection on .22LR as a defensive round, from Greg Ellifritz.

The reader asked me to explain why I considered the .22 stops to be more likely “psychological stops” as opposed to physical incapacitations.  That’s easy to explain…and it doesn’t have anything to do with the size of the muzzle.

There are only two mechanisms for physically incapacitating someone with a handgun.  The first is a shot to the central nervous system (CNS).  A bullet placed into the brain or the upper spinal cord will usually stop someone instantly.  Can the .22 do that?  Certainly, but I think a brain or CNS shot is less likely with the .22 than with a larger caliber.

Another fact that many people haven’t considered is the difference between police and armed citizen gunfights.  My friend Claude Werner often points out that when a criminal is involved in a gunfight with the police, the stakes are higher.  The criminal knows that the cops won’t stop until he’s dead or in jail.  That’s not true with a gunfight against an armed citizen.  The armed citizen just wants a break in the fight.  If he can cause the criminal to flee, he wins and stops shooting.

Take a look at this surveillance video from a Florida robbery a couple of years ago: Once one of the supposed “victims” starts to fire back, the bad guys beat feet, and quickly. In their experience, having a person fight back is as foreign to them as someone speaking Albanian at the McDonald’s drive up window is to me. When it happens, they have no idea how to handle it, and de-ass themselves from the area as quickly as they can.

The very definition of a psychological stop.

Now, am I will to bet my life and the lives of my loved ones on a crook running away when he’s shot? Nope. That’s why I carry something bigger and train I’m semi-competent with my gun of choice. However, the first rule of gunfight is still in effect: Have a gun, even if it’s a wimpy little .22.

No Excuses.

I’m constantly amazed by how many people buy a gun, get a CCW permit, and then do absolutely nothing. In my first training class, my instructor said that only one in three of his students would take the steps necessary to carry their guns on a day in, day out basis, and if anything, I think he over-estimated that number.

In an attempt to stem the tide and get people used to carrying, I’ve tried to lay out what a new gun owner should do before, during and after their concealed carry permitting class so they have a chance to put what they’ve learned into practice.

It’s over on Ricochet.com. Enjoy.

How Hard Is It To Shoot Like A Marine?

Not very hard.

USMC-CPP-COF

FIVE SECONDS for two shots from the holster at a target that’s 7 yards away? Does that include time for a Starbucks run and a mani-pedi? Look, I get that Marines have a lot to learn, like how to call in artillery fire and small unit tactics, stuff that I (thankfully) don’t have to worry about, but if you qualified Expert on that course of fire, you’re probably looking at D Class (the lowest class available) if you shoot in USPSA.

Marching As To War

Looks like the J.V. team is going on the road:

ISIS Kill List Names 15,000 Christian Americans Targeted for Death

According to a report recently made public, early this year, ISIS specifically identified 15,000 Christian Americans for death and instructed jihadists already in America to begin widespread murder.

The Kill List report comes in the wake of ISIS already publicly warning American and British Christians that “they were next.” British police last week publicly warned its 5.4 million Christians to be on alert and in some areas increased security.

And the kicker? The FBI didn’t warn anyone on the list they were targeted by ISIS. How thoughtful of them.

The list was apparently created by culling through published church directories and other sources. 15,000 people out of America’s millions and millions of Christians seems pretty small (and it is), but terrorists have a bad habit of killing other people on their way to their main target, so this is something that everyone who attends a church needs to take into account.

Is there someone in charge of handling emergencies at your place of worship? What’s the procedures for your church staff if there’s a worshipper who has a medical emergency in the sanctuary? Where’s the nearest hospital/fire station/police station? Can a car drive right up to and into the narthex of your church? If so, it’s only a matter of time before someone stomps on the gas instead of brake and causes mayhem aplenty.

And that’s accidentally. Imagine what would happen if someone did that on purpose.

Look, I agree 100% with what St. Paul wrote about our struggle not being with flesh and blood, but with spiritual wickedness, but the fact is, spiritual wickedness (and if this sort of thing isn’t wicked, what is?) is behind this threat to our faith and Christianity’s existence on the Earth.

It’s time to take up the cross. And take up the sword as well.