I won a gun

First it was the new CZ, now this. I won A Daniel Defense DDM4V1, courtesy of Friends Of The NRA.

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The DDM4v1, the original Daniel Defense Rifle, is built with a Cold Hammer Forged 16” M4 Profile barrel with a Carbine gas system.  It comes installed with our proprietary front sight base which is precision CNC machined from a solid billet of 4140 steel.  This FSB features a serrated curved design to minimize glare and is salt bath nitride treated minimizing corrosion and wear.  The DDM4 Rail 12.0™ FSP allows the operator to mount a weapon light or aiming device forward of the front sight for optimal ergonomics and a clear line of sight.  Quick disconnect attachment points are integrated to the front and back on both sides of the rail for fully ambidextrous sling attachment.  This rifle also comes with the newly designed, rugged and comfortable Daniel Defense Buttstock and Pistol Grip.

Yay me!

It’s a good gun, but I think I’ll sell it and use my ill-botten gooty to pick up a 1911 for Single Stack and tweak the new CZ for use as a backup for Production.

New Acquisition: Another CZ!

Gosh, what are the odds?

AIM Surplus had these for sale last night, and I got one for myself (with the wife’s permission, of course) as a combination birthday/Father’s Day gift. Good thing I did, because they sold out an hour later after I bought one.

Used CZ75 for sale

Czech manufacture CZ 75 9mm caliber semi-automatic Handgun. Law Enforcement Trade-Ins from Israel… Incredible single/double action “cock and lock” pistols that feature all steel construction and a hammer forged barrel. These short recoil operated, locked breech handguns are in excellent mechanical condition, just some metal finish wear as the pictures show. Include one 15rd magazine.

So now (with a little work) I’ll have a backup to the Production CZ75 I’ve been using, and CZ-USA has Pre-B mags in-stock.

Cool.

Quick thoughts on open carry

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Open-carry with a Serpa holster is like wearing a clip-on tie to your best friend’s wedding. You can do better, so do so.

If you want open carry to become the norm, normal people must act normal while carrying openly. People who carry AR-15’s into Jack In The Box are not acting normally.

I miss having open carry. I really do. Even though I carried sans concealment only about once a month at best, there was a pleasant feeling knowing that if I wanted to do it, I could, and would.

I’ve lost weight, and my old open carry belt is too big on me now. Fortunately, I work in a gun store, and replacements are close at hand.

If you can try open carry haven’t, do so soon. You’ll find that all the worries you had about carrying concealed will pop up once again, and just like when you started carrying concealed, no one will care that you have a gun.

The Police Are The “Only Ones Qualified”, Part the Whatever

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I qualified for HR218 last week so I can open-carry at work. I easily made the par times and dropped two shots for the entire qualifier, one when I shot the first part from retention, and one when I went for headshots on Stage 2, because gamer.

To be honest, HR218 is EASY. The course of fire should be a breeze for any “D” class or above USPSA shooter, and it’s a cakewalk compared to the IDPA classifier. I did find out I need to practice shooting from retention more often: I felt awkward shooting from that position, and my aim was HORRID.

Tab Clearing, 05/12/15 Edition

A few notes in passing…

Congratulations to my TeamGunblogger cohort Jaci Janes for joining Team Sig Sauer! Jaci’s innate talent and commitment to the shooting sports far exceeds mine, so it’s good to see all her hard work rewarded in this way.

Ben and Luke over at Triangle Tactical tackle my question about practical shooting drills for an indoor range, and I like their ideas. I should note that the Surefire Shot Timer app comes with a dandy par timer setting which would work well with their suggestions.

Should you ever shoot someone in the back? Good question. About 15 years ago, I did a run through the Tempe Police Department video simulator, and did quite well on the shoot/no shoot tests, right up to the point where I refused to back-shoot someone who had just shot my partner. The prep made it to cover, and shot me. Game over. Looking back on it now, the programmers of the sim decided the dude was an “imminent deadly threat” because he already offed a (virtual) cop and therefore was likely to kill again. Which he did. I get the idea, but still, shooting someone in the back seems…

This is how the media SHOULD be talking about practical shooting

Take a few moments to read this story on Wired.com about a big-time “Big Buck Hunter” video game contest, and ask yourself what it would take for Wired or Stuff or some other trendy media outlet to talk about USPSA or 3 Gun with the same amount of enthusiasm.

Some select points from the article:

“It’s all patterns,” he’d say. “If you want to win, just know the patterns.”

Patterns are key. Bucks appear in specific places at specific times. Knowing the patterns requires practice. Practice requires time. Time requires money. But my friends and I are young. We can find time and money.

Sounds a lot like Steel Challenge to me…

“Andy (a gamer in the article) touches on the growing trend of players owning personal Big Buck machines. “You used to be a douchebag if you did that,” he says. “But then those people started winning championships. So.”

Waiting for the inevitable “Playing Big Buck Hunter will get you killed in the woods” comments…

“The stereotype is that most of the people who love BBH are Republican, pro-gun, NRA members. That’s true, but only to an extent.”

No comment.

“By the time I get to The Pourhouse, (the site of the championship), the atmosphere is much as I remember it from Friday. Same faces, same outfits, same rodeo energy. The emcee implores the crowd to drink Old Milwaukee, because it’s the sponsor and it’s free. A hype video introducing “Big Buck Hunter HD Wild” plays on a screen. It has lots of new animals.”

Think about how SOCIAL playing this game is, and then think about how social the average USPSA match is. Sure, the guys on the squad trash talk with each other and have fun, but when’s the last time you were at a match that a) had spectators b) had facilities for spectators or c) encouraged spectators to be social and root for their favorites.

The finals offer a three-trek format, a change that benefits Tower, who tends to be a faster shot. He pulls away early, blasting at bucks even as they materialize. He hits them all. It’s freakish, and unstoppable. He takes the match. Green and orange confetti falls from the rafters. Tower raises his arms in triumph.

I catch up with him a little later. He’s glowing with excitement and perhaps alcohol. “Only had four beers all day,” he says. I have trouble believing him. Then he says he’s the fastest Big Buck Hunter shot in the world. I have no trouble believing him. I ask if he’s got any advice.

“Aim small, hit small,” he says.

I have no idea what this means, but damned if it doesn’t sound good.

Hey, look, a competitor who can differentiate his type of performance from everyone else out there! How fresh! How exciting! How completely absent from USPSA! We call Rob Leatham “The Great One” (and he is) but WHY is he the great one? What makes his style so dominating versus Max or Eric or Jerry? How do we expect to stimulate interest in our sport if the people who shoot it aren’t interesting?

Playing a video game in a bar is exciting, social and popular. Shooting a match is exciting, and if we can figure out a way to make it social, we can make it popular.

The question is, is that what we want to do?

The TV ad Glock needs to make, and soon.

* Slow camera pan down towards darkened city street, past sign that says "Free Speech Cartoon Contest Tonight" *

* Camera pan right to a police car, doors open, lights on *

* Pan right to pair of chalk outlines on the pavement, with a nearby AK-47 and some 7.62x39 brass casings *

* Pan up to R. Lee Ermey squatting next to the chalk outlines *

Dialogue

Looks like somebody picked the wrong place for jihad.”

Cut to Glock logo.

Still not here

Not going to be here for a while, either. The store opens on Wednesday, and for the next two weeks, I’m working 12 hour days.

The good news is, I’m putting rounds downrange, and will be doing so more often now that we’re open. Got to shoot a Sig P226 TacOps this weekend (niiiiiice), a PX (not impressed), an H&K P30 (good, not great), a ZevTech Glock (best Glock I’ve shot, which is like being the skinniest kid in fat camp…), and a Ruger LC9s (MUCH improved).

Stay tuned.

15:01

Little bit of advice: If the target demographic for your product tends to own lots and lots of guns, headlining a pro-gun control rally might NOT be considered a wise career move.

But why let that stop you?

On July 17, country singers Tim McGraw and Billy Currington will headline a fundraiser for gun control group Sandy Hook Promise in Connecticut. McGraw’s “A Concert For Sandy Hook Promise” will also feature country singers Billy Currington and Chase Bryant.

What, were the Dixie Chicks not available?