Silver Screen, Hot Lead

Shooting USA and Arfdotcom have compiled a list of the Top Ten Movie Gunfights Of All Time, and it’s not half-bad.

  1. The bank robbery scene from “Heat”
  2. Master Sgt.Gordon and Sgt.1st Class Shughart’s final battle from “Blackhawk Down”
  3. The last fight scene in “The Kingdom”
  4. The Battle of la Drang Valley from “We Were Soldiers”
  5. The assault/chase scene from “Ronin”
  6. The end of “Tears of the Sun”
  7. The Brécort Manor assault scene from “Band Of Brothers”
  8. The final shootout from “Quigley Down Under”
  9. The final shootout in “Léon” (The Professional)
  10. The three-way gun fight from “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly”

It’s great to see Luc Besson get a mention on this list as I’ve admired his work for years (Memo to Anne Parillaud: Call me. Anytime.). Personally, though, I’d swap out “Tears of the Sun” with John Woo’s iconic and game-changing shootouts from “A Better Tomorrow” and instead of “The Kingdom” I’d have the assassination sequence from “Clear and Present Danger”, (which was so well-done the DSS uses it as a training video), but the list as it is quite good indeed, and a good starting point if you’re looking to add some first-rate action movie DVD’s to your collection.

 
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December 31st, 2009 by exurbankevin

Silver Screen, Hot Lead

Shooting USA and Arfdotcom have compiled a list of the Top Ten Movie Gunfights Of All Time, and it’s not half-bad.

  1. The bank robbery scene from “Heat”
  2. Master Sgt.Gordon and Sgt.1st Class Shughart’s final battle from “Blackhawk Down”
  3. The last fight scene in “The Kingdom”
  4. The Battle of la Drang Valley from “We Were Soldiers”
  5. The assault/chase scene from “Ronin”
  6. The end of “Tears of the Sun”
  7. The Brécort Manor assault scene from “Band Of Brothers”
  8. The final shootout from “Quigley Down Under”
  9. The final shootout in “Léon” (The Professional)
  10. The three-way gun fight from “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly”

It’s great to see Luc Besson get a mention on this list: I’ve admired his work for years (Memo to Anne Parillaud: Call me. Anytime.). Personally, I’d swap out John Woo’s iconic and game-changing shootouts from “A Better Tomorrow” instead of “Tears of the Sun” and the instead of “The Kingdom” I’d have the assassination sequence from “Clear and Present Danger”, (which was so well-done the DSS uses it as a training video), but the list as it is quite good indeed, and a good starting point if you’re looking to add some first-rate action movie DVD’s to your collection.

More …

 
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December 31st, 2009 by admindude

Stop Anthroprogenic Contintental Drift Now!

Just in case President Obama learns from his mistake and makes some remarks about the earthquake in San Diego today, our fevered imaginations inside sources have an early version of the text of press release:

Good Afternoon,

All of you would not be reading this unless you — like me — were convinced that the danger of anthroprogenic continental drift, or ACD, is real.  This is not fiction, it is science.  Unchecked, ACD will pose unacceptable risks to our security, our economies, and our planet.  This much we know.

The question, then, before us is no longer the nature of the challenge — the question is our capacity to meet it.  For while the reality of ACD is not in doubt, I have to be honest, as the world watches us today, I think our ability to take collective action is in doubt right now, and it hangs in the balance.

I believe we can act boldly, and decisively, in the face of a common threat.  That’s why I am speaking to you today — not to talk, but to act.

First, all major economies must put forward decisive national actions that will reduce the movement of the continents on which they reside, and begin to turn the corner on ACD.  I’m pleased that many of us have already done so.  Almost all the major economies have put large stakes in the ground to anchor their countries in place, and I’m confident that America will fulfill the commitments that we have made to dive at least 4,621 telephone poles all the way into the ground  by 2020, and more than 7,454 by 2050.

Second, we must have a mechanism to review whether we are keeping our continents from moving, and exchange this information in a transparent manner.  These measures need not be intrusive, or infringe upon sovereignty. Without such accountability, any agreement would be empty words on a blog.

I don’t know how you have an international agreement where we all are not sharing information and ensuring that we are meeting our commitments.  That doesn’t make sense.  It would be a hollow victory, and just the rantings of some kid from Kenya who tricked his way into the most important job on the planet.

Number three, we must have financing that helps faster-moving continents slow down, particularly those with populations most vulnerable to motion-sickness.  America will be a part of fast-start funding that will ramp up to $10 billion by 2012.  And yesterday, Secretary Hillary Clinton, my Secretary of State, made it clear that we will engage in a global effort to mobilize $100 billion in financing by 2020, if — and only if — it is part of a broader accord that I have just described.

Mitigation.  Transparency.  Financing.  It’s a clear formula — one that embraces the principle of common but differentiated responses and respective capabilities.  And it adds up to a significant accord — one that takes us farther than we have ever gone before as an international community.

I just want to say to this press conference that we are running short on time.  And at this point, the question is whether we will move forward together or split apart, whether we prefer posturing to action.  I’m sure that many consider this an imperfect framework that I just described.  No country will get everything that it wants.  There are those developing countries that want aid with no strings attached, and no obligations with respect to transparency.  They think that the most advanced nations should pay a higher price; I understand that.  There are those advanced nations who think that developing countries either cannot absorb this assistance, or that will not be held accountable effectively, and that the world’s fastest-moving countries should bear a greater share of the burden.

We know the fault lines because we’ve seen the damage done by them for years.  These international discussions have essentially taken place now for almost two decades, and we have very little to show for it other than than increased acceleration of San Francisco into the sea.  The time for talk is over.  This is the bottom line:  We can embrace this accord, take a substantial step forward, continue to refine it and build upon its foundation.  We can do that, and everyone who is in this room will be part of a historic endeavor — one that makes life better for our children and our grandchildren.

Thank you.

 
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December 30th, 2009 by exurbankevin

Sign O The Times

If American society believes in anything, it’s that improper behaviour can be cured by putting up a sign. For example, we all know that putting up a no-smoking sign completely deters anyone from smoking in a restaurant or bar. Experience has also shown us that everyone always, always obeys the posted speed limits and the “No Left Hand Turn On Red” signs on our nation’s highways, right? No one would ever, ever, EVER of ignoring a those prominent “No Weapons Allowed” signs that have turned our nation’s schools and IKEA stores into peaceful havens of utter quietness in an otherwise troubled world.

With that in mind, I’ve created the ultimate anti-terrorist screening system. It’s environmentally friendly, unobtrusive and much less embarrassing than a full body scan. In addition to all of that, it’s guaranteed to work just as effectively as all those other warning systems I mentioned before, meaning we’ll never have to worry about det-cord corsets again. Who needs Janet Napolitano when you’ve got one of these at every boarding gate?

 
Number of comments: 1 Add comment
December 30th, 2009 by exurbankevin

Stop Anthroprogenic Continental Drift Now!

Just in case President Obama learns from his mistake and makes some remarks about the earthquake in San Diego today, our fevered imaginations inside sources have an early version of the text of press release:

Good Afternoon,

All of you would not be reading this unless you — like me — were convinced that the danger of anthroprogenic continental drift, or ACD, is real.  This is not fiction, it is science.  Unchecked, ACD will pose unacceptable risks to our security, our economies, and our planet.  This much we know.

The question, then, before us is no longer the nature of the challenge — the question is our capacity to meet it.  For while the reality of ACD is not in doubt, I have to be honest, as the world watches us today, I think our ability to take collective action is in doubt right now, and it hangs in the balance.

I believe we can act boldly, and decisively, in the face of a common threat.  That’s why I am speaking to you today — not to talk, but to act.

First, all major economies must put forward decisive national actions that will reduce the movement of the continents on which they reside, and begin to turn the corner on ACD.  I’m pleased that many of us have already done so.  Almost all the major economies have put large stakes in the ground to anchor their countries in place, and I’m confident that America will fulfill the commitments that we have made to dive at least 4,621 telephone poles all the way into the ground  by 2020, and more than 7,454 by 2050.

Second, we must have a mechanism to review whether we are keeping our continents from moving, and exchange this information in a transparent manner.  These measures need not be intrusive, or infringe upon sovereignty. Without such accountability, any agreement would be empty words on a blog.

I don’t know how you have an international agreement where we all are not sharing information and ensuring that we are meeting our commitments.  That doesn’t make sense.  It would be a hollow victory, and just the rantings of some kid from Kenya who tricked his way into the most important job on the planet.

Number three, we must have financing that helps faster-moving continents slow down, particularly those with populations most vulnerable to motion-sickness.  America will be a part of fast-start funding that will ramp up to $10 billion by 2012.  And yesterday, Secretary Hillary Clinton, my Secretary of State, made it clear that we will engage in a global effort to mobilize $100 billion in financing by 2020, if — and only if — it is part of a broader accord that I have just described.

Mitigation.  Transparency.  Financing.  It’s a clear formula — one that embraces the principle of common but differentiated responses and respective capabilities.  And it adds up to a significant accord — one that takes us farther than we have ever gone before as an international community.

I just want to say to this press conference that we are running short on time.  And at this point, the question is whether we will move forward together or split apart, whether we prefer posturing to action.  I’m sure that many consider this an imperfect framework that I just described.  No country will get everything that it wants.  There are those developing countries that want aid with no strings attached, and no obligations with respect to transparency.  They think that the most advanced nations should pay a higher price; I understand that.  There are those advanced nations who think that developing countries either cannot absorb this assistance, or that will not be held accountable effectively, and that the world’s fastest-moving countries should bear a greater share of the burden.

We know the fault lines because we’ve seen the damage done by them for years.  These international discussions have essentially taken place now for almost two decades, and we have very little to show for it other than than increased acceleration of San Francisco into the sea.  The time for talk is over.  This is the bottom line:  We can embrace this accord, take a substantial step forward, continue to refine it and build upon its foundation.  We can do that, and everyone who is in this room will be part of a historic endeavor — one that makes life better for our children and our grandchildren.

Thank you.

More …

 
Number of comments: 0 Add comment
December 30th, 2009 by admindude

Sign O The Times

If American society believes in anything, it’s that improper behaviour can be cured by putting up a sign. For example, we all know that putting up a no-smoking sign completely deters anyone from smoking in a restaurant or bar. Experience has also shown us that everyone always, always obeys the posted speed limits and the “No Left Hand Turn On Red” signs on our nation’s highways, right? No one would ever, ever, EVER of ignoring a those prominent “No Weapons Allowed” signs that have turned our nation’s schools and IKEA stores into peaceful havens of utter quietness in an otherwise troubled world.

With that in mind, I’ve created the ultimate anti-terrorist screening system. It’s environmentally friendly, unobtrusive and much less embarrassing than a full body scan. In addition to all of that, it’s guaranteed to work just as effectively as all those other warning systems I mentioned before, meaning we’ll never have to worry about det-cord corsets again. Who needs Janet Napolitano when you’ve got one of these at every boarding gate?

More …

 
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December 30th, 2009 by admindude

This will do for now

This will do until I get my M-613A3 or a real lightsaber.

And it’s being made by a company in Tempe, too.

Hmmmnn, I wonder if they’d be willing to trade one out for some website work…

 
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December 29th, 2009 by exurbankevin

Almost flight-ready

Once again the unorganized (but well-regulated) militia succeeds where all the King’s horses and all the King’s men failed: Northwest Flight 253 was saved from destruction not by the system, but rather through the actions of one passenger who refused to be a victim. (Hmmmn, “Refuse to be a victim” sounds catchy. Someone should make a self-defence course around that phrase. I digress…).

Inspired by this post over at The Volokh Conspiracy, I set out to see if I could do what every TSA agent has to do before they fly: Pass the Federal Air Marshal Tactical Pistol Course.

Ok, first a little background on training and whatnot. I’ve been shooting seriously for a couple of years now,:I have my CCW, I’ve been through the NRA Personal Protection Classes and I shoot USPSA practical pistol competitions about once a month. Iin addition to that, I put about 100-200 practice rounds a month downrange. I’m not good, but I’m not bad.

So, did I pass the test?

I had to modify the test a bit and use USPSA cardboard targets because I don’t have any of the FBI “Milkbottle” targets that the TSA uses. To keep things similar to the TSA scoring, I counted “A” and “B” zones hits as five points and “C” zone hits count as three points, with  “D” zone hits and all misses counting zero.

Other than that, I think I replicated things pretty well: I used my CZ75 loaded with 115 grain Federal FMJ’s in an IDPA-legal Blade-Tech holster concealed with an IDPA-legal cover garment. The course was shot outside earlier at Rio Salado where it was frickkin’ cold (55 degrees and really, really windy).

So, did I pass the test?

Almost. Let’s go the results.

The Federal Air Marshal Tactical Pistol Course (TPC), like the classic El Presidente, is shot cold (i.e., no warmup) on the FBI QIT target
All strings are shot from a distance of seven yards.

Individual Drill Starting
Position
Total Time
Allowed
Total
Rounds
My Time My Score
One Round (twice) Concealed from Holster 1.65 seconds
(3.30 total)
2 3.26 secs 8
Double Tap (twice) Low Ready 1.35 seconds
(2.70 total)
4 2.31 secs 16
Rhythm; fire 6 rounds at one target; no more than 0.6 second between each shot. Low Ready 3.00 seconds 6 2.56 secs 26
One Shot, speed reload, one shot (twice). Low Ready 3.25 seconds (6.50 total) 4 6.42 secs 18
One Round each at two targets three yards apart (twice) 1.65 seconds
(3.30 total)
4 2.81 secs  18
180° pivot. One round each at three targets (twice). Turn left, then right. Concealed from Holster 3.50 seconds
(7.00 total)
6 5.79 secs  24
One Round, slide locks back; drop to one knee; reload; fire one round. (twice) Low Ready 4.00 seconds
(8.00 total)
4 6.98 secs  18
Total 30  Pass Fail

Qualification:

Time: Cannot exceed total time for each drill. Example: Drill #1 – 1st time 1.70 seconds, 2nd time 1.55 seconds; Total = 3.25 seconds = Go. Must achieve a “GO” on each drill.

Accuracy: Target is FBI “QIT” (bottle). Total rounds fired is 30. Point value inside bottle = 5. Point value touching line or outside bottle = 2. Maximum possible score = 150. Mininum qualifying score = 135.

All stages must equal “GO” to qualify. If you don’t qualify, you don’t fly!

I shot it fast enough, but I wasn’t accurate enough. I scored 128, too low to qualify. A few more “A” zone hits and I would have made it.

So, what did we learn today?

  • The TSA Pistol Qualification is tough, but passable for anyone who practices regularly. I’m a “D” ranked USPSA shooter, and I almost made it.
  • I need to work on my groups more.
  • There’s a lot more to being a TSA agent than just shooting well, so no, I’m not in favour of opening up the skies to anyone with a CCW.
  • On the other hand, the next time someone tells you that the cops are the only ones who should have guns because they’re the only ones who know how to use them well, send them here.
  • Better yet, take them to the range.

More …

 
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December 28th, 2009 by exurbankevin

A Brilliant Creation

Vox has created a Facebook Group for Arizona’s conservative bloggers.

 
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December 27th, 2009 by exurbankevin

A Brilliant Creation

Vox has created a Facebook Group for Arizona’s conservative bloggers.

More …

 
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December 27th, 2009 by admindude